IPMS/USA Gallery

ROK F-47 Thunderbolt

ROK F-47 Thunderbolt

5 photos

Model by Phil Peterson >> When North Korea attacked the South in 1950, the ROK didn't have any combat aircraft to defend themselves. The US hastily gathered some resources to provide for a squadron. Originally the thought process had been to provide F-51 Mustangs as these were plentiful. However, bright minds understood that the aircraft would probably be used more in the ground attack role, a role which the liquid cooled engine of the Mustang has a severe disadvantage. Luckily, there were still several F-47 Thunderbolts available and with its robust structure, 8 .50 cal machine guns and dive bombing capability, these airframes were shipped to Korea. A group of American pilots lead by Col. Dean Hess took on the task of training these pilots and even participating in several missions. After the war, these airframes were replaced with F-86 Sabres. This is the Academy P-47D Thunderbolt kit in 1/72nd. It was constructed mostly out of the box except the aerial had to be moved back one panel or it would block the open canopy. The kit was painted using Wal-Mart house brand rattle cans. Aluminum for the BMF and Flat Black for the anti-glare panel. The markings were scrounged from the Academy P-51 Korean War kit and represent Col. Hess' real mount. Overall a fairly simple build with no real difficulties.

IAF S.92

IAF S.92

1 photo

Model by Phil Peterson >> In 1948, Israel had signed a deal with Czechoslovakia for several Avia S-199 fighters. These were crated and shipped by Israeli transport planes. What is little known is that included with the shipments were 3 crates containing S-92 jets (licensed version of the Me-262) and several spare engines. These were assembled and housed in a hanger at the far end of Ekron AFB and kept in secret. To fly these planes, Israel recruited former RAF test pilot Flight Capt. Henry Biggles. Biggles had flown several captured German aircraft including the Me-262 and would be the perfect pilot to get theses planes operational. Unfortunately, on the first test flight, one of the other pilots landed too fast and ran off the end of the runway. The plane was cannibalized to keep the other two flying. Due to shortages in fuel and ammo, the planes were seldom used and only achieved one kill against an Egyptian C-47. The kit is the Revell ProModeler 1/72nd scale Me-262. The model was built out of the box and fit well except for where the rear of the wing meets the fuselage. I put a brace in to assist with the fit. Model was sprayed with a rattle can and decals scrounged from an old Micro Scale Israeli set.